We all have things that frighten us, for me that is snakes, I just don't like them. I can totally appreciate that they eliminate many bugs and little rodents in the state of Texas but I want them to do those things far away from me. So, when I saw this photo of a snake coming out of a birds mouth I immediately thought this is what nightmares are made of.

The photo was captured by Elise Kitchens as she was getting in a hike at Brazos Bend State Park which is just southwest of the Houston area this past Saturday, March 5th. Beyond trying to get some exercise on the weekend she is also a photographer which is why she had a camera with her and was able to get such an amazing shot. The bird is an American Bittern and it was feeding on a red-bellied mudsnake.

Get our free mobile app

The Snake Was Trying To Avoid Becoming a Meal for the Bird

According to Texas Park and Wildlife Elise mentioned that this snake had been swallowed twice but it kept trying to come back up to make it's escape. But the third time was the final attempt and the bird finished the job and finished consumption of the snake. You have to appreciate the fight that the snake made for survival but it just wasn't enough to get away.

My Reaction Would Have Been Much Different

If I would have seen this I would have run the other way, putting as much space between me and the snake as possible. The picture will probably haunt my dreams for years to come, but it is a great representation of the circle of life. Talk about being in the right place at the right time, and having the perfect equipment to capture the moment.

LOOK: 30 fascinating facts about sleep in the animal kingdom

Wildlife of the Texas Panhandle

The Texas Panhandle is filled to the brim with wonderful species of wildlife. Here are some of the incredible animals that share their home with us.

Here are 14 Exotic Animals That You Can Own in Texas

Texas has an estimated 7.2 million dogs, more than any other state, this according to the American Veterinary Association. Safe to say, dogs are a Texan's best friend. But perhaps you’re interested in branching out a bit and adding a less common exotic pet to your home.

Granted a few of these exotics are regulated and will require permits.

More From Mix 93.1