It was the famed Whitehouse John Tyler District Championship game of 2013, and Patrick Mahomes was "doing what Patrick do"  all night. He ran for 85 yards on 18 carries, but the 13-yard run late in the 3rd quarter stays with me to the grave -  as it told me everything I ever wanted to know about the man-child and why he will change things. In 2013, Mahomes was in his senior year and everyone was on board with him playing on Sunday some day. It was 3rd down and 9 from about the 15, so Whitehouse could get a new set of downs (of course) without scoring. "In those days", if you worked or stood on the sideline, you better pay attention when Mahomes or JT qb Geo McCollister are scrambling. They go from first gear to forth in about a step and a half. Bryan Houston and I were doing the Whitehouse broadcast and I cover my portion of color commentary from the field. Fast forward to about 4 seconds into the play when Mahomes began to "reverse the field" and was headed to my sideline. Patrick only runs out of bounds after he has exhausted ALL avenues of gaining what he can, where he can. As we all started to retreat backwards to allow for the least amount of collisions as well as give him ample room to slow down, he planted his left foot at the sideline and dove forward for a couple more yards. Check your reflexes boys. 2 JT defenders blew Mahomes up in mid air sending him at a much greater velocity towards everyone scrambling for safer ground. With my game sheet in one hand and microphone in the other, I jumped backwards and reset my footing with just enough space to block "bigfoot" from rolling all the way to the track. As number 5 came to a stop, my natural reactions kicked in and I reached down to grab each side of his shoulder pads in the front to pull him up.

He was laughing.

Like a kid that just realized the roller coaster wasn't scary after all.......IT WAS AWESOME!!! He had fallen off his bike and it didn't hurt. Mom caught him jumping down from the tree and it was really fun.

Ashley Wirz, 1340 The Fan

As I lifted him off the ground........laughing, he let out a joyful, "WHOOOOO" simultaneously with Bryan asking me, "wow Kenny, sounds like you were in on that tackle, you ok"? After reaching his feet, Mahomes gave me a firm whack on the butt with a "Nice catch" attached to it on his way back onto the field. The result of the play was a first down at the 5. His launch back into the field is what his team needed to succeed on that play, at that time of the game, and on that field right then. Mission accomplished; Whitehouse won the game 55-54 in what would end up being a Top 3, in my opinion,  most exciting game in Patrick's high school career. The photo below was taken at his final game of his career back in December of 2013 and also ranks as a Top 3 finisher.

We have all been totally mesmerized by his demeanor and displays of humbleness and integrity towards his family, his friends, and his teammates ever since we gained access to his life and heart through the massive amount of exposure this country's media has provided us. He talks with no reservations, total confidence, and genuine compassion for all he has been entrusted with protecting. He isn't burdened with concerns about inflection, or content or the awkwardness of sensitivities to those he speaks about. He doesn't have to worry about these things because they have never occupied time in his heart or mind. He's simply a good man that is absolutely elated he gets an opportunity to be great everyday and can't wait for the next one. If you truly want to admire what we are all watching unfold in front of us, don't listen to Patrick Mahomes.  Hear him. Watch him; then try to match it. Care about the people before yourself, without saying anything. Don't just "be a fan", learn then apply. He's trying his best to get your attention. Don't let him down.  He was the same kid as a kid, then a teenager, now an adult...There are just more people watching now. Pay attention because this sportscaster is not alone in truly believing that Big Foot 5 (my own nickname for Patrick) will, in the end, not only make his mark on athletes and people in general, he will change the entire culture of professional sports before he is done.