Stroke is the fifth-leading cause of death in the U.S. It's also the leading cause of disability. According to statistics from the CDC, over 795,000 people in the U.S. every year. Out of that number, 140,000 of those people will die. Sobering statistics, indeed.

What is a stroke? They occur when one of the blood vessels that supply blood to the brain is blocked by a clot or, alternatively, in the event a weak vessel in the brain bursts.

Not surprisingly, other risk factors include smoking, obesity, high cholesterol, and diabetes.

Get our free mobile app

May is National Stroke Awareness Month. When it comes to knowing the signs of a stroke, knowing sooner rather than later can save a life. If you or someone you love is showing indication that they may be having a stroke, please don't put off making a call and getting help immediately.

According to the CDC, the signs to watch for include a severe headaches with no other cause, trouble walking with loss of balance or coordination, dizziness, trouble seeing in either one or both eyes, numbness in face, leg, or arm--particularly if it's on one side, and confusion or trouble understanding speech.

The American Stroke Association has a helpful acronym know as FAST as an easy to remember guide when every minute matters.

F--Face Drooping

A--Arm Weakness

S--Speech

T--Time to Call 911

To learn more about how to prevent, treat, and recover from a stroke, please acquaint yourself with the American Stroke Association's website.

LOOK: Answers to 30 common COVID-19 vaccine questions

While much is still unknown about the coronavirus and the future, what is known is that the currently available vaccines have gone through all three trial phases and are safe and effective. It will be necessary for as many Americans as possible to be vaccinated in order to finally return to some level of pre-pandemic normalcy, and hopefully these 30 answers provided here will help readers get vaccinated as soon they are able.

KEEP READING: See 25 natural ways to boost your immune system